Yellow Words

I speak in Yellow Words. They are the beach of two different cultures coming together. I’m asking those around me to walk on this beach. The rocks are uncomfortable and the journey is long but at the end is a pot of gold of understanding. It’s something that I know we both want.

All they see is the sour grapes. The road is different for each person and they assume that I’m on the wrong beach, but it’s my beach. I created it because I knew that some people would want to go there. I have to believe that because I love being there. It’s up to me to work hard for understanding. Harder than I ever worked before. Talking to others helps me figure out what the magic words are. What would I need to tell you to get you to walk a beach with me? What would be the right thing to say?

Trust and the issues of no self-trust. People were raised by their functional family first. They were never really understood. The power of the duo is that you only need one other person to believe you to share ideas. The interesting part is when that ย person listens and adds to what you have to say. You’ve become something more, something better, something wonderful. A brilliant hybrid.

I had a sister who was my other and we invented worlds where we were anything and we tapped into them to assuage our fears. My sister was afraid of being alone in the bathroom, so instead of never addressing her needs, she invented a world for us to play in. In the bathroom. That is powerful because we shared something real, intimate and really not normal, but it showed me the power of play and how it can address fears that are irrational with a solution that’s illogical unless you are a kid and you know how powerful scenes can be. They make the mundane fun.

Yellow words make my world fun. I want others to be there with me and I know they can be if they imagine. Truly imagine.

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About KC

I am Katarina Countiss, a multimedia designer. I like blogs, games, art and technology. I am curious about how things are made.
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