Lasercut Stencil Poetry

Last Tuesday, I made my first series of stencils at SoDo MakerSpace using their Pro LF Series 48×36 CO2 Laser with RetinaEngrave 3D Ethernet.

I intend to put them on thrift store bought shirts and sell them as “greeting shirts” (like greeting cards only in shirt form). A twist on the classic graphic tee because the shirt can complement or clash the statement painted on top.

In this case of the Thank You shirt (one of a kind, see below), there’s a sweetness to it. The original design underneath, the flowers peeking through the wall of “thank yous” gives the design depth and more than just text to look at.

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Video: Candles and a Haircut

hair-cutASMR: Candles and a Haircut [binaural] – YouTube.

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Before and after. I should have documented this better. I love my hair. In all its phases. I really want to do a documentary on it. Hair’s really weird because it’s this dead thing that grows out of you and immediately becomes fashion’s plaything. Ever since the blond thing and even a little before that (it was a notable amount of black curls dominating my presence– see below for reference), it was remarkable. People feel like they can approach me and say things about my hair which is cool, but also really weird. I’m not used to that kind of attention. I like the way it looks and that’s my reason for doing the things that I do to my hair, but it’s interesting when others want to weigh in on it.

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Hair of Summer 2013

I was at a party the other day and saw a woman with similar hair coloring (shoulder length, bleached-platinum blonde) but it was already growing out. I saw that it looked like some black fell on her otherwise platinum head. I didn’t want my growing roots to make my hair look like an accident, so I tried to even the score (black vs. bleach blonde). This is my first time trying to record myself giving myself a haircut (should have used the front facing camera). I was definitely guessing where I was in the frame.

Anyways, a post, mostly about my hair. It’s very soft. I welcome any of my friends and acquaintances to pet it, if they’d like. Ask first, or gesture non-threateningly.hair-cut3

The above picture was grabbed from a video project I did a couple days after the hair cut. I have to say I really like this length. Later that weekend, I went to a haircutting professional and had it evened out. Imperfections became too distracting whenever I looked in the mirror. I’d like to note that there was a sweet lock of hair keeping the nape of my neck warm that I would like to make sure finds its way back.

 

 

The audio

Recorded on a 3Dio Freespace Pro Binaural Microphone: layers of poetry, talk of neuroscience, box tapping and a brook somewhere in there. A few tracks are slowed down, creating a weird otherwise unidentifiable noise.

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Video: The Science of Aesthetics

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ASMR: The Science of Aesthetics [binaural] – YouTube.

Results of some scrapings. I twirled in my lab with my favorite shawl and my favorite red dress for some visuals. Water textures, trees, the view from the passengerside of a car driving by a sweet blue sky.

The audio

Recorded on a 3Dio Freespace Pro Binaural Microphone: A lecture recorded in a noisy bookstore with snippets of another conversation where Echo and Slick are a little non-sequitor and an excerpt from Alan Lightman’s “The Accidental Universe”

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The Language of Digital Content, a talk at SIC 2014

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I attended the Seattle Interactive Conference the last two days. The second session I went to was “The Language of Digital Content: Why Mobile and Video are Changing the Conversation.”

Anne Gherini (@AnnieG) of StumbleUpon was a great follow up to The Revolution Of TV Online. She discussed different formats of Digital Content and highlighted the creativity of some upcoming technologists (What Is A Technologist?) and I’ll just briefly link to them at some point below.

She talked about how social media platforms are like renting. You are a slave to Facebook’s algorithms. (How does Facebook decide what to show in my news feed? | Technology | The Guardian.) So, consider owning by directing your users to your website where you can put on better analytics (for data) and control the presentation of your content (your designers will love you for it).

With Mobile and in general, digital media, it’s important to choose the right brand ambassador who will speak to your niche audience. Internet engagement comes in all varieties (here’s where I link to commerically successful creative new media artists)

anthony spears @LOHANTHONY | Engaging through tweets. Consistency, authenticity, energy? What makes this figure so compelling? Look at how many followers (real followers, he has!)

Meagan Cignoli @MeaganCignoli This is her twitter summary “I create videos for the world’s leading brands, largely on Vine and Instagram. Cannes Lion winner, named Digital Entrepreneur of the Year.” Engaging through stop-motion creativity using social media platforms to tell branded stories. Nicely done.

@Shonduras Uses handdrawn overlays on snapchat photo shares to create a timely, creative, relevant and playful story which earned him some Disney dollars. For more, see Snaps To Riches: The Rise Of Snapchat Celebrities.

Takeaways:  creatively engage your audience on social media, pay attention to upcoming media generators (read: social media with a formatting tools, stuff like vine and instagram)

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The Revolution Of TV Online, a talk at SIC 2014

daryl-mcnutt

I attended the Seattle Interactive Conference the last two days. The first session I went to was “The Revolution Of TV Online: Get Ready For 20 Million On Demand Channels By 2018.”

Daryl McNutt (@darylgmcnutt) of Adaptive Media showed the audience snippests of online telelvisiont rhough their various platforms such as Hulu and Xbox. Hulu had methods of syndication and obtaining revenue from sponsors that made it a pioneer in the Online Television business model. Netflix was a pioneer of quality online only original series with hits like the latest season of Arrested Development TV Series and Orange Is the New Black TV Series.

Youtube is still the amazing relevant video dump that it has been for a long time. It has changed the way we watch video. Many of us consume more video but they’re shorter and packed Online Television means more options. With mobile devices, it’s mostly tablets, but I’ve seen some convincing articles like this: Turn smartphone into CINEMA PROJECTOR with £16 cardboard box | Daily Mail Online.

So, we can chose the where, what and how long with the myriad of options of YouTube and other up and coming online media channels like Vimeo and pay for just what we want if at all. Everyone on social media breathed a collective sigh of satisfaction when they saw headlines like this: HBO to Launch Stand-Alone Streaming Service.

As a person with a childhood of Television Saturation (a whole afternoon to evening line-up took up my whole afternoon and evening) this has been a great time to focus on the things that I actually want to watch and not just what’s “on.” It’s funny because my generation (most of us anyways) never really paid for television. We went right on from our parents paying for cable to searching for stuff we like through discovery engines like StumbleUpon and sharing stuff we like to our friends via social media links.

An audience member asked about how to create content for a small screen and in the same vein, how to integrate content across multiple screens. McNutt replied (all paraphrasing here, folks) that REI is using different sequences for different segments, moving the user through devices and different screens, 6 Ways REI Shapes the Digital Consumer Experience. The issue is how to keep track of where the user is through the journey through multiple devices without having them to log in.

He showed a cars.com commercial (Cars.com: Family Reunion) emphasizing that celebrities aren’t necessary if you have compelling content.

Takeaways: make your media snackable, brace yourself for the wide-open option-filled media space of the Internet, run analyses of your audience to see what media you should be focusing on because it’s integrated content requires a planned strategy

 

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Video: The First Woodwinds Show

wood-windsASMR: The First Woodwinds Show [binaural] – YouTube.

I put on my handpainted dress and painted my face in a matching branch motif and recorded myself playing a Woodwinds Show. As the title promises, it’s the first of many, hopefully. I am planning on getting more collaborators in the media lab. So, if you play an instrument (woodwinds preferred, but I’m not judging) please let me know and we can jam. When I play music I just like getting notes out. It’s like drawing for me. There is a sense of being inspired by what I put down, so each thing is informed by what came before it, but I don’t restrain myself. There are no keys, no modes, nothing that my high school music composition teacher could be proud of, but I’m playing music, so I am happy for that. It’s the first time I’ve recorded myself playing the clarinet and the first time this year of playing it. It’s a beautiful wooden clarinet that I will be playing more often. If you have a classy dinner party and you want live music, let me know… It will be improvisational experimental jazz.

I love the kaleidescope effect here with my paintings in the background and my microphone in the foreground. The media lab is my favorite place to take self portraits because I feel that this environment so completely reflects (and completes) me.

Recorded on a 3Dio Freespace Pro Binaural Microphone: I’m playing a few flutes and a clarinet and it’s overlaid on itself

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My First Seattle Interactive Conference (2014)

sic2014

I attended the Seattle Interactive Conference the last two days. It was my first conference. I’ve been to a few unconferences, (InfoCamp Seattle and Mobile UX Camp Seattle) but this was the first time I shelled out the big bucks for a conference at Seattle’s Downtown Conference Center.

The sessions were neatly packed onto their website in a way that I picked out the sessions that I wanted to go to like a child trying out some new candies based on their packaging. Some of the sessions left a bitter taste in my mouth. The typos on the slides and the lack of enthusiasm from the speaker. I won’t sugar coat this summary/review blog post. It was a rough time for me. I went to the conference alone and though I had fellow alumni from Seattle Central Creative Academy around somewhere, I didn’t really reach out as much as I could have.

Being a withdrawn artist-designer, I’ve found some of these networking functions to ring false. I feel like Edward Norton’s character in Fight Club where anyone I would talk to, it would be a single-use friend. I’d say hello, try to explain what a self-employed multimedia designer is and then ask them what they do. They’d say “marketing” of some kind and I would shudder a little.

This conference, by the way, was themed “Spotlighting Makers” which spoiled half of the talks for me because the way the speaker handled it was “You deal with a product in some way, congratulations, you’re a maker.” If you have to be told you’re a maker, bug off. You don’t deserve to be in the same movement. Not that I have any right to be exclusionary, or that language should be a way to help people reaffirm their identities or something, but really. A conference where people talk about “Makers” is pretty absurd. It’d be different if there were some making going on at the conference, but half the talks weren’t even about that so let’s not conflate the already bloated term.

Anyways, I had a good time listening to Steve “Espo” Powers talk about his graffiti/sign painting work and Mel Carson about Personal Branding. Mel Carson was great not just because of his elegant and articulate British accent, though it was marvelous, but because he wielded it with the right amount of confidence and humor. And, you’ll see in the upcoming post exactly what I think about Espo. I’ll start by saying that he was the first speaker on the second day and I knew that it was all worth it when I saw him talk.

In the upcoming posts, I’m going to summarize, review and link to some stuff talked about at Seattle Interactive Conference. And to be clear, I’d probably go again next year. I’d love to be asked to attend as a speaker. One day. I have to keep my head clear and get more industry experience.

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